RESOURCES

Parent Info and Guides | Screening Tools | Local Area Resources and Groups | 24 Hour Hotlines

Parent Info and Guides

OUR FAMILY CONTRACT Download Here
from STRAIGHT TALK FOR PARENTS

Why You Should Talk With your Child about Alcohol Download Here
Why Your Child Might Start Drinking Alcohol Download Here
Conversation Starters for Your TeenagerDownload Here
Helping your Child Feel Connected to School Download Here
Power of Parents: Tips to prevent underage drinking
Parent Teen Driving Agreement Download Here
Underage Drinking Myths vs. Facts Download Here
Talking to your kids about prescription drug abuse Download Here
Alcohol and Drug Addiction Happens in the Best of Families…and it Hurts Download Here
The Truth about “Bath Salts” Download Here
Tips for Reducing Underage Binge Drinking Download Here
NIAAA Rethinking Drinking: Alcohol and your health
Tips for parents How to Talk to your Kids about Alcohol
TALK – They Hear You!
Stop Alcohol Abuse
How To Explain to Your Teen Why You Don’t Want Him Drinking or Using Drugs

Parents’ guide to the Teenage Brain Download Here 
What to look for if you think your child is involved with drugs or alcohol Download Here

Click on a category below to be directed to the subject you are interested in:

Prevention & Self Esteem| Alcohol | Drugs |Internet Safety |Recovery | Advocacy

Disclaimer:The Council Rock Coalition for Healthy Youth (CRCHY) has prepared this web site as a public resource for informational purposes only. It is intended, but not promised or guaranteed, to be correct, complete and up-to-date. The links within this site may let you leave this site (the “linked sites”).The links within this site are not under the control of CRCHY, and CRCHY is not responsible for, nor warranties the accuracy of the contents of any linked site, or any link contained in a linked site, or any changes, updates or modifications to such sites. CRCHY provides these links only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply endorsement by CRCHY of the site, or any association with their operations.

PREVENTION & SELF ESTEEM

Above the Influence:  http://www.abovetheinfluence.com
Every teen’s life is filled with pressure, some of it good, some of it bad. Our goal is to help teens stand up to negative pressures, or influences. The more aware you are of the influences around you, the better prepared you will be to face them, including the pressure to use drugs, pills, and alcohol. We’re not telling you how to live your life, but we are giving you another perspective and the latest facts. You need to make your own smart decisions. We want teens to live Above the Influence.

The Cool Spot: 
http://www.thecoolspot.gov
The Cool Spot was created for kids 11-13 years old by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). The NIAAA is the lead U.S. agency supporting research into the causes, prevention, and treatment of alcohol problems. It is a component of the National Institutes of Health, within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Developing Your Child’s Self-Esteem: http://kidshealth.org/parent/emotions/feelings/self_esteem.html
Healthy self-esteem is like a child’s armor against the challenges of the world. Kids who know their strengths and weaknesses and feel good about themselves seem to have an easier time handling conflicts and resisting negative pressures. They tend to smile more readily and enjoy life. These kids are realistic and generally optimistic.

Drug Free:  http://www.drugfree.org and http://www.drugfree.org/resources/
Helping kids and teens reject substance abuse by influencing attitudes through persuasive information.  Need help? Get Help! Drug prevention, abuse, intervention, treatment and recovery. Drugfree.org provides answers, guidance, tips, and stories.

 Drug Prevention 4 Teens:  http://www.justice.gov/dea/pr/multimedia-library/publications/prevention4teens.pdf
Learning for Life has partnered with the Drug Enfrocement Administration (DEA), the federal agency best known for dismantling international and domestic drug trafficing organizations. DEA is also a leader i teh prevention community and works with schools, parents, communities, and the public to provide accurate infromation on the harm drugs cause. Learning for Life groups, posts, and participants embrace these efforts in our communities and, with DEA Special Agents across the nation, hope to have an impact on teen drug use in our country.

Drug Watch:  http://www.drugwatch.org
Drug Watch International is a volunteer non-profit drug information network and advocacy organization that promotes the creation of healthy drug-free cultures in the world and opposes the legalization of drugs. The organization upholds a comprehensive approach to drug issues involving prevention, education, intervention/treatment, and law enforcement/interdiction.

Join Together:  http://www.jointogether.org
The nation’s leading provider of information, strategic planning assistance, and leadership development for community based efforts to advance effective alcohol and drug policy, prevention, and treatment. Join Together is a collaboration of the Boston University School of Public Health and The Partnership at Drugfree.org, dedicated to advancing effective drug and alcohol policy, prevention and treatment.

National Families In Action:  http://www.nationalfamilies.org
National Families in Action, Helping families and communities prevent drug use among children by promoting policies based on science. For 33 years, National Families in Action (NFIA) has opposed the legalization of marijuana. We still do. We do not want to see a third commercial industry market an addictive drug to children, like the tobacco and alcohol industries do today. Unfortunately, California nearly legalized marijuana in November 2010. Several states are preparing to follow in 2012. A federal legalization bill has also been introduced. This Campaign mobilizes citizens to demand that any policymaker who legalizes marijuana include in the law provisions that ensure the drug will not be marketed or sold to children.

NIDA for Parents: http://teens.drugabuse.gov/parents
Parents are often concerned about whether their children will start or are already using drugs such as tobacco, marijuana, and others, like prescription drugs. Learn the scientific facts about drugs and drug abuse and what you can do to prevent your children from starting to take drugs or progressing further into drug abuse.

Parents – The Anti-Drug:  http://www.theantidrug.com
Created by the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign to equip parents and other adult caregivers with the tools they need to raise drug-free kids.

Parenting. org – Moral Development: http://www.parenting.org/article/moral-development
The task of teaching moral values has become increasingly difficult in today’s materialistic, sex-saturated society. You have the difficult task of preparing your teen for battles against sexual pressures. However, there are so many harmful messages attacking your teen from all sides that you might feel overwhelmed and defenseless. The first line of defense is to develop a strong value system in your teen.

Pride Youth Programs:  http://www.prideyouthprograms.org
Parents’ Resource Institute for Drug Education, a leader in the drug prevention field with innovative programs. What moves you? What can you do to move others? Each year at the PRIDE World Drug Prevention Conference, people from around the world gather to move and be moved. Finding what motivates, what inspires and what it takes to create true, meaningful change.

 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: http://www.samhsa.gov 
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America’s communities. In order to achieve this mission, SAMHSA has identified 8 Strategic Initiatives to focus the Agency’s work on improving lives and capitalizing on emerging opportunities.

What’s Driving You:  http://www.whatsdrivingyou.org
An interactive, thought-provoking experience for kids, parents, young adults, teachers and prevention professionals who are concerned about drinking and driving.

ALCOHOL

Al-Anon and Alateen: http://www.al-anon.alateen.org
Al-Anon (which includes Alateen for younger members) has been offering hope and help to families and friends of alcoholics. In Al-Anon, members do not give direction or advice to other members. Instead, they share their personal experiences and stories, and invite other members to “take what they like and leave the rest”—that is, to determine for themselves what lesson they could apply to their own lives. The best place to learn how Al-Anon works is at an Al-Anon meeting in your local community. Personal contact is an important element in the healing process. These Web page selections may give you some encouragement to visit your first meeting.

Alcoholics Anonymous:  http://www.aa.org
Alcoholics Anonymous® is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for AA membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions. AA is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy, neither endorses nor opposes any causes. Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.

The Cool Spot: http://www.thecoolspot.gov
The Cool Spot was created for kids 11-13 years old by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). The NIAAA is the lead U.S. agency supporting research into the causes, prevention, and treatment of alcohol problems. It is a component of the National Institutes of Health, within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

MADD: http://www.madd.org
Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD). The mission of Mothers Against Drunk Driving is to stop drunk driving and support the victims of this violent crime.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: http://www.samhsa.gov 
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America’s communities. In order to achieve this mission, SAMHSA has identified 8 Strategic Initiatives to focus the Agency’s work on improving lives and capitalizing on emerging opportunities.

Time To Act:  http://www.timetoact.drugfree.org/
It can be a scary time when you suspect or discover your child is drinking or using drugs. Even the savviest of parents can feel lost and unsure of what to do. The Partnership for a Drug Free America has launched Time To Act, a new, first-of-its-kind resource to help parents spot signs and symptoms, have productive conversations with their teens, and find outside help if they need it. Time To Act was created to ensure that every parent has free access, on their own terms, to the most current research-based information on how to help their child – and their family – take the next steps. The Partnership, and CADY, believes that no parent should go through this alone, without guidance from experts and other parents.

Women For Sobriety:  http://www.womenforsobriety.org
Women For Sobriety, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping women overcome alcoholism and other addictions. Women For Sobriety, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping women overcome alcoholism and other addictions. It is, in fact, the first national self-help program for women alcoholics. Our “New Life” Program helps achieve sobriety and sustain ongoing recovery. WFS has been providing services to women alcoholics since July, 1976. The WFS “New Life” Program grew out of one woman’s search for sobriety.

DRUGS
Drug Free:  http://www.drugfree.org and http://www.drugfree.org/resources/
Helping kids and teens reject substance abuse by influencing attitudes through persuasive information.  Need help? Get Help! Drug prevention, abuse, intervention, treatment and recovery. Drugfree.org provides answers, guidance, tips, and stories.

Drug Prevention 4 Teens:  http://www.justice.gov/dea/pr/multimedia-library/publications/prevention4teens.pdf
Learning for Life has partnered with the Drug Enfrocement Administration (DEA), the federal agency best known for dismantling international and domestic drug trafficing organizations. DEA is also a leader i teh prevention community and works with schools, parents, communities, and the public to provide accurate infromation on the harm drugs cause. Learning for Life groups, posts, and participants embrace these efforts in our communities and, with DEA Special Agents across the nation, hope to have an impact on teen drug use in our country.

Drug Watch:  http://www.drugwatch.org
Drug Watch International is a volunteer non-profit drug information network and advocacy organization that promotes the creation of healthy drug-free cultures in the world and opposes the legalization of drugs. The organization upholds a comprehensive approach to drug issues involving prevention, education, intervention/treatment, and law enforcement/interdiction.

Free Vibe:  http://www.freevibe.com
Get the facts on a number of drugs. Share your own stories and ideas about drugs, peer pressure, or whatever.

Narcotics Anonymous:  http://www.na.org
Narcotics Anonymous, a community-based association of recovering drug addicts. Our Vision is that every addict in the world has the chance to experience our message in his or her own language and culture and find the opportunity for a new way of life.

National Families In Action:  http://www.nationalfamilies.org
National Families in Action, Helping families and communities prevent drug use among children by promoting policies based on science. For 33 years, National Families in Action (NFIA) has opposed the legalization of marijuana. We still do. We do not want to see a third commercial industry market an addictive drug to children, like the tobacco and alcohol industries do today. Unfortunately, California nearly legalized marijuana in November 2010. Several states are preparing to follow in 2012. A federal legalization bill has also been introduced. This Campaign mobilizes citizens to demand that any policymaker who legalizes marijuana include in the law provisions that ensure the drug will not be marketed or sold to children.

NIDA for Parents: http://teens.drugabuse.gov/parents
Parents are often concerned about whether their children will start or are already using drugs such as tobacco, marijuana, and others, like prescription drugs. Learn the scientific facts about drugs and drug abuse and what you can do to prevent your children from starting to take drugs or progressing further into drug abuse.

Prescription Drug Abuse http://www.drugfree.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Preventing-Teen-Abuse-of-Prescription-Drugs-Fact-Sheet-2draft-Cephalon-sponsored.pdf
How many teens are abusing prescription drugs — and why? And what can parents do to prevent this risky behavior? Find answers to these questions and more in this fact sheet.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: http://www.samhsa.gov 
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America’s communities. In order to achieve this mission, SAMHSA has identified 8 Strategic Initiatives to focus the Agency’s work on improving lives and capitalizing on emerging opportunities.

Teen Drug Evolution: A Parent’s Resource Guide: http://www.lakeviewhealth.com/teen-drug-evolution-a-parents-resource-guide.php
When parents think of teenage drug abuse, it is often street drugs that they are concerned about. Illegal drugs such as marijuana, heroin and ecstasy are some of the drugs that are frequently associated with teen abuse. Although these types of drugs still represent a problem for kids, an increasing source of concern is found right in the home. This concern involves prescription drugs and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. Both of these drugs have harmful and even deadly consequences when taken incorrectly or abused.

 

Time To Act:  http://www.timetoact.drugfree.org/
It can be a scary time when you suspect or discover your child is drinking or using drugs. Even the savviest of parents can feel lost and unsure of what to do. The Partnership for a Drug Free America has launched Time To Act, a new, first-of-its-kind resource to help parents spot signs and symptoms, have productive conversations with their teens, and find outside help if they need it. Time To Act was created to ensure that every parent has free access, on their own terms, to the most current research-based information on how to help their child – and their family – take the next steps. The Partnership, and CADY, believes that no parent should go through this alone, without guidance from experts and other parents.

INTERNET SAFETY

Find Safe Online Communities for Your Teen: http://about.fashionplaytes.com/safe-online-communities-kids-managing-online-safety-privacy/ 
Kids and teens growing up today have the whole world at their fingertips thanks to technology like smartphones, tablets and Wi-Fi. It’s a lot harder to monitor your kids’ safety online than it is at the playground or the shopping mall – where you can clearly see exactly what’s going on and who they’re talking to at all times. You want your kids to be able to take advantage of the many opportunities and resources available online, but you want them to stay safe.

NetSmartz: Internet Safety for Teens: http://www.netsmartz.org/Teens 
There’s a lot to deal with on the Internet—cyberbullies, privacy settings, gossip, and even creeps. These resources can help you navigate the Internet while guarding your reputation.

TOBACCO

Action on Smoking and Health:  http://www.ash.org
Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) is a national nonprofit legal action and educational organization fighting for the rights of nonsmokers against the many problems of smoking. ASH uses the tremendous power of the law to represent nonsmokers in courts and legislative bodies, and before regulatory agencies. For more than 40 years, ASH has been one of the most effective antismoking and nonsmokers’ rights organizations in the world.

The Truth:  http://www.thetruth.com
Tobacco education and marketing manipulation by Tobacco companies.

RECOVERY

Al-Anon and Alateen: http://www.al-anon.alateen.org
Al-Anon (which includes Alateen for younger members) has been offering hope and help to families and friends of alcoholics. In Al-Anon, members do not give direction or advice to other members. Instead, they share their personal experiences and stories, and invite other members to “take what they like and leave the rest”—that is, to determine for themselves what lesson they could apply to their own lives. The best place to learn how Al-Anon works is at an Al-Anon meeting in your local community. Personal contact is an important element in the healing process. These Web page selections may give you some encouragement to visit your first meeting.

Alcoholics Anonymous:  http://www.aa.org
Alcoholics Anonymous® is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for AA membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions. AA is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy, neither endorses nor opposes any causes. Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.

Drug Free:  http://www.drugfree.org and http://www.drugfree.org/resources/
Helping kids and teens reject substance abuse by influencing attitudes through persuasive information.  Need help? Get Help! Drug prevention, abuse, intervention, treatment and recovery. Drugfree.org provides answers, guidance, tips, and stories.

Families Anonymous: http://www.familiesanonymous.org
Families Anonymous is a group of concerned relatives and friends who have faced up to the reality that the problems of someone close to us is seriously affecting our lives and our ability to function normally.

Narcotics Anonymous:  http://www.na.org
Narcotics Anonymous, a community-based association of recovering drug addicts. Our Vision is that every addict in the world has the chance to experience our message in his or her own language and culture and find the opportunity for a new way of life.

Smart Recovery:  http://www.smartrecovery.org
Self-Management And Recovery Training, an alternative to Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. SMART Recovery® is the leading self-empowering addiction recovery support group. Our participants learn tools for addiction recovery based on the latest scientific research and participate in a world-wide community which includes free, self-empowering, secular and science-based, mutual-help support groups.

Women For Sobriety:  http://www.womenforsobriety.org
Women For Sobriety, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping women overcome alcoholism and other addictions. Women For Sobriety, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping women overcome alcoholism and other addictions. It is, in fact, the first national self-help program for women alcoholics. Our “New Life” Program helps achieve sobriety and sustain ongoing recovery. WFS has been providing services to women alcoholics since July, 1976. The WFS “New Life” Program grew out of one woman’s search for sobriety.

ADVOCACY

Join Together:  http://www.jointogether.org
The nation’s leading provider of information, strategic planning assistance, and leadership development for community based efforts to advance effective alcohol and drug policy, prevention, and treatment. Join Together is a collaboration of the Boston University School of Public Health and The Partnership at Drugfree.org, dedicated to advancing effective drug and alcohol policy, prevention and treatment.

MADD: http://www.madd.org
Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD). The mission of Mothers Against Drunk Driving is to stop drunk driving and support the victims of this violent crime.

OTHER RESOURCES

CADCA – Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America
CAMY – Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth
Cardinal Health – Generation Rx Outreach Program
CASA – The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University
CDC – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
CENTURY COUNCIL
DAWN – Drug Abuse Warning Network (SAMHSA)
DEA – Drug Enforcement Administration
National Kick Butts Day
MADD – Mothers Against Drunk Driving
MetLife Foundation Partnership Attitude Tracking Survey
Monitoring the Future -
NARCONON
NCAA – National Association for Children of Alcoholics
NCADD – National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence
NDIC – National Drug Intelligence Center
NHTSA – National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
National Inhalant Prevention Coalition
NIAAA – National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
NIDA – National Institute on Drug Abuse
NIDA for Teens
NIH – National Institutes of Health
National Recovery Month
NSC – National Safety Council
NSDUH – NATIONAL SURVEY ON DURG USE AND HEALTH 
ONDCP    – Office of National Drug Control Policy
The Partnership at DRUGFREE.ORG
PIRE – Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation
SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions)
SAMHSA  – Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration